Top design: Best practices that will get your newsletters read [Infographic]

It’s hard enough to get emails to land in inboxes (a quarter of all emails never make it there), so if you’re one of the lucky ones, you don’t want to turn off your newsletter subscribers with a poorly designed product. In an infographic, email design firm Email Monks has detailed a few tips for “exemplary emails.” Here are a few takeaways:

Brand yourself
For optimal branding, the “From Name” field should always include your brand name or a consistent name that will be recognizable. The footer should always include your organization’s contact details and a simple line about why your recipients are receiving the email.

Keep it short and snappy
The subject line should be informative but short enough so a complete idea is read. Additionally, main content should use short sentences and paragraphs for preview panes and snippet text.

Visuals: Beautifully simple
Fonts used should be standard and readable, although non-standard fonts can be used if kept to a minimum. Keeping mobile users in mind, the ideal font size for body copy is 14 pt.

For images, Email Monks advises against GIFs and background photos as some email clients won’t support them. Email Monks also advises against directly embedding videos; instead, still images should be used and linked to videos.

Mobile is now
According to email marketing firm Litmus, 42 percent of emails are now opened on a mobile device, so marketers should think about the differences between viewing a page on a PC versus a mob

ile device. Things to consider are finger targets (are you fat-finger friendly?), visible call-to-actions (can readers see links?) and
layout (one-column only).

For more tips (Did you know the “Johnson Box” is the most valuable part of your email?), click here or view the infographic below.

By Elizabeth A. Reid

Click to enlarge

Emaildesign best practices

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